Food Trucking at a Church Bell Ringing World Record Attempt (Sounds Like Something I Was Made For)

A booking request just came through one of the lists we’re on with our food truck. There’s a church here in PA attempting to break a world record for most people continually ringing a steeple bell for 24 hours,  and they’re making it a party!

Not to Put Too Fine a Point on It, But

This is the precise moment VH1 stopped playing music videos and the record industry as a whole decided they needed more control of their artists’ output.  Both realized there’d probably never be a song better than this:

On Meeting People

I sometimes hear my single friends say it’s hard meeting people.

I suppose if I had to meet people, I’d use the internet.  A reputable site that matches interests and all of that.

Where do people meet?  All kinds of places, I guess. I’m not sure lots of people feel very safe doing that anymore. Or if it’s a good idea for anyone.

Meeting in a song is a good gig if you can get it.   I recommend “13” by Big Star and “Bus Stop” by the Hollies. If you can find Leonard Cohen’s Tower of Song, that could also work. Jack White’s “We’re Going to Be Friends.”   “When Stars Go Blue” by Ryan Adams.

Carl Wilson’s voice.

 

 

Listening to 80s Music with Karl Barth

Very thoughtful survey. I’ve thought of Das Nichtige as “nothingness” because it consists of all that God opted not to create, and that because there “is” God and the things God opted to create, there must also be “not God” or “the nothingness.” Am I misreading Barth there?

Pop Culture and Theology

By Jack Holloway

I make a lot of “best of” playlists. Recently, I made a playlist of what I think are the 150 greatest 80s songs (find it here). I listened to hours and hours and hours and hours of 80s music, soaking it all in, and, like the Apostle Paul, “examining everything carefully, holding fast to everything good.”

I primarily study the theology of Karl Barth, and so I thought a lot about Barth’s theology as I contemplated the music I was listening to. Barth talks about God’s No and Yes, God’s wrath and redemption, judgment and forgiveness, and on and on. He thinks Christians should move from one realization to the other, from understanding our sinfulness to God’s forgiveness, from seeing sin and death to believing in God’s redemption.

“Human experience and thought,” he says, “would proceed in a straight line from despair to even deeper despair…

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